hunkyhollywood:

Mark Wahlberg as Dirk Diggler in Boogie Nights.

15 things that make me happy, tagged by the great and powerful shukaari

1. being out of the house, doing chill things with chill friends 

2. being inside the house, not doing anything

3. when you’re on the same page with somebody on a thing you were kinda worried about

4. when it’s friday night and you realize you have no plans on saturday or sunday and you can sleep in

5. some form of pda and intimacy with friends. like cuddling, linking arms, hugging, resting heads on shoulders and whatnot (even tho i tell ppl i date that i don’t like that shit)

6. discovering places on my own and bringing back a friend and they like that place too

7. first sip of good ol reliable boba

8. when you feel connectedness with the world

9. a bra that fits

10. that one time my sister and i went on thunder mountain railroad by ourselves

11. singing loudly in cars 

12. when i make a stranger laugh 

13. when i pay all of my bills but have enough

14. when a plan comes together

15. receiving good news

i’m gonna tag ppl semi-randomly in alphabetical order a-z aspirinboy dendenpassion etothevictory icecreamcheoreom marxisforbros v-itasoy 

thepeoplesrecord:

Hong Kong’s unprecedented protests & police crackdown, explained
September 29, 2014

Protest marches and vigils are fairly common in Hong Kong, but what began on Friday and escalated dramatically on Sunday is unprecedented. Mass acts of civil disobedience were met by a shocking and swift police response, which has led to clashes in the streets and popular outrage so great that analysts can only guess at what will happen next.

What’s going on in Hong Kong right now is a very big deal, and for reasons that go way beyond just this weekend’s protests. Hong Kong’s citizens are protesting to keep their promised democratic rights, which they worry — with good reason — could be taken away by the central Chinese government in Beijing. This moment is a sort of standoff between Hong Kong and China over the city’s future, a confrontation that they have been building toward for almost 20 years.

On Wednesday, student groups led peaceful marches to protest China’s new plan for Hong Kong’s 2017 election, which looked like China reneging on its promise to grant the autonomous region full democracy (see the next section for what that plan was such a big deal). Protest marches are pretty common in Hong Kong so it didn’t seem so unusual at first.

Things started escalating on Friday. Members of a protest group called Occupy Central (Central is the name of Hong Kong’s downtown district) had planned to launch a “civil disobedience” campaign on October 1, a national holiday celebrating communist China’s founding. But as the already-ongoing protesters escalated they decided to go for it now. On Friday, protesters peacefully occupied the forecourt (a courtyard-style open area in front of an office building) of Hong Kong’s city government headquarters along with other downtown areas.

The really important thing is what happened next: Hong Kong’s police cracked down with surprising force, fighting in the streets with protesters and eventually emerging with guns that, while likely filled with rubber bullets, look awfully militaristic. In response, outraged Hong Kong residents flooded into the streets to join the protesters, and on Sunday police blanketed Central with tear gas, which has been seen as a shocking and outrageous escalation. The Chinese central government issued a statement endorsing the police actions, as did Hong Kong’s pro-Beijing chief executive, a tacit signal that Beijing wishes for the protests to be cleared.

You have to remember that this is Hong Kong: an affluent and orderly place that prides itself on its civility and its freedom. Hong Kongers have a bit of a superiority complex when it comes to China, and see themselves as beyond the mainland’s authoritarianism and disorder. But there is also deep, deep anxiety that this could change, that Hong Kong could lose its special status, and this week’s events have hit on those anxieties to their core.

This began in 1997, when the United Kingdom handed over Hong Kong, one of its last imperial possessions, to the Chinese government. Hong Kong had spent over 150 years under British rule; it had become a fabulously wealthy center of commerce and had enjoyed, while not full democracy, far more freedom and democracy than the rest of China. So, as part of the handover, the Chinese government in Beijing promised to let Hong Kong keep its special rights and its autonomy — a deal known as “one country, two systems.”

A big part of that deal was China’s promise that, in 2017, Hong Kong’s citizens would be allowed to democratically elect their top leader for the first time ever. That leader, known as the Hong Kong chief executive, is currently appointed by a pro-Beijing committee. In 2007, the Chinese government reaffirmed its promise to give Hong Kong this right in 2017, which in Hong Kong is referred to as universal suffrage — a sign of how much value people assign to it.

But there have been disturbing signs throughout this year that the central Chinese government might renege on its promise. In July, the Chinese government issued a “white paper” stating that it has “comprehensive jurisdiction” over Hong Kong and that “the high degree of autonomy of [Hong Kong] is not an inherent power, but one that comes solely from the authorization by the central leadership.” It sounded to many like a warning from Beijing that it could dilute or outright revoke Hong Kong’s freedoms, and tens of thousands of Hong Kong’s citizens marched in protest.

Then, in August, Beijing announced its plan for Hong Kong’s 2017 elections. While citizens would be allowed to vote for the chief executive, the candidates for the election would have to be approved by a special committee just like the pro-Beijing committee that currently appoints the chief executive. This lets Beijing hand-pick candidates for the job, which is anti-democratic in itself, but also feels to many in Hong Kong like a first step toward eroding their promised democratic rights.

Full article
Photo 1, 2, 3

Tear gas may have the immediate effect of dispersing the peaceful demonstrators, but if you make people cry, and the tears are from their heart, how can you govern?
27 Shockingly Surreal Photos Of Hong Kong Protests

slluxcaptor:

It’s unbelievable as to how safe hk always felt and now suddenly its so violent when the protesters did NOTHING WRONG AND YOU SEE THE POLICE THEY AREN’T PROTECTING THE PEOPLE. They’ll nothing but pawns of the government.

talkingtrashcan:

menstrualcramps:

strawmouse:

strawmouse:

Some things friends/family in Hong Kong have shared with me today.

The people of Hong Kong are fighting for their right to democracy, free speech, and un-censored information. Protests have shut down major parts of the city. Police are attacking protesters with pepper spray and tear gas. Tanks are rolling through the streets.

In the West, Hong Kong is often lumped together with China. Many aren’t aware of the city’s incredibly complex, diverse culture, independent of China. Don’t overlook this. Don’t sit back as China breaks the promises it made to Hong Kong, endangering the lives and freedom of over seven million people.

Spread this like fire. We may be far away, but we can raise awareness.

I’m just going to put this here again, because as impressive as the professional photos on BBC/NYT/etc are, all of these pictures are from family/friends of mine, all of whom are people who are currently in Hong Kong, living through this. Perhaps just to me, that is more powerful than anything I’ll see on the front of a newspaper. 

thank you for putting this together ali!!!!!!!

Woah !!!

asianamericanactivism:

blexicana:

im1004:

1968, Asian American high school students attend the Black Panther Party funeral rally for Bobby Hutton,16 years old BPP member.

Now that’s what I’m talking about!

Photo by Nikki Arai (who also took the famous photo of Richard Aoki). On April 12, 1968, Oakland High students walked out to attend the memorial rally. Bobby Hutton was killed by OPD on April 6, 1968, in an armed attack on the Oakland BPP office, two days after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.

asianamericanactivism:

blexicana:

im1004:

1968, Asian American high school students attend the Black Panther Party funeral rally for Bobby Hutton,16 years old BPP member.

Now that’s what I’m talking about!

Photo by Nikki Arai (who also took the famous photo of Richard Aoki). On April 12, 1968, Oakland High students walked out to attend the memorial rally. Bobby Hutton was killed by OPD on April 6, 1968, in an armed attack on the Oakland BPP office, two days after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.

I hope this works…. This is the slo-mo function on my iPhone. Pretty kewl

You would say that! Can you tell them to make chargers that don’t break, the quality on this thing is real flimsy

You would say that! Can you tell them to make chargers that don’t break, the quality on this thing is real flimsy

naw i think it starts with a c???

does anyone remember the brand of those better quality iphone chargers???

they were getting reblogged everywhere. please let me know! these apple chargers are weak. i got a new phone and so i want to start this new experience off right